A Standard of Care

by Jim, October 30, 2010

in Patient Care

A Standard of Care

Doug Isaacs, MD | John J. Peruggia, BSHuS, EMT-P | From the The Silent Killer Issue Proper sensor placement will ensure fast, accurate readings. Illustration Masimo Corp.After successfully rescuing two trapped Fire Department of New York (FDNY) firefighters, an officer complained of lightheadedness and mild shortness of breath. Initial assessment revealed him to be normotensive, [...]

Tags:  

Five Tips for Basic Airway Management

by Jim, October 30, 2010

in Paramedic Notes

Five Tips for Basic Airway Management

Christopher T. Stephens, MS, MD, NREMT-P | Jimmie Meurrens, BS, NREMT-P | From the October Issue Friday, October 1, 2010 Advanced-level providers should understand that not all patients with airway problems are candidates for intubation. Photo Ryche Guerrero Use of the BVM is one of our most important basic airway skills. Photo Courtney MccainThis clinical [...]

Tags: , ,  

Making Sudden Cardiac Arrest a Reportable Condition

by Jim, October 30, 2010

in Paramedic Notes

Making Sudden Cardiac Arrest a Reportable Condition

Mary Newman | Thursday, October 28, 2010 After decades of trying, no national reporting system routinely captures OHCA incidence and outcomes. Photo Jeanette Galie Burkle/Galie PhotographySudden unexpected cardiac arrest occurring outside the hospital (OHCA) strikes 295,000 Americans of all ages each year (1). Unfortunately, OHCA survival rates have languished at a dismal 7% for decades [...]

Tags: , , , , ,  

Airway Encounters

by Jim, October 30, 2010

in Patient Care

Airway Encounters

Criss Brainard, EMT-P | From the October Issue Friday, October 1, 2010 One of your initial decisions should always be to address airway management. Photo Criss brainardEngine 201, Rescue 4 and Medic 11 are dispatched to an unconscious person near a bayside hotel. It’s reported that bystanders are attempting to rescue the patient from the [...]

Tags: ,  

Epilepsy for EMS

by Jim, October 30, 2010

in General Topics

Epilepsy for EMS

At some point in their lives, one person in 10 will experience a seizure. By age 75, 3% will have epilepsy. So if you, as an EMS provider, haven’t encountered an epileptic or seizure patient to this point in your career, rest assured–you probably will. It is among the missions of the Epilepsy Foundation to [...]

Tags:  

Judgment Calls

by Jim, October 30, 2010

in Patient Care

Judgment Calls

   One definition of judgment in the dictionary is “the cognitive process of reaching a decision or drawing conclusions.” To do this well in the prehospital setting is a challenge, because of the enormity of the consequences of our decisions and the short amount of time in which we have to make them. To use “good [...]

Tags: ,  

Continuing Your Education

by Jim, October 30, 2010

in General Topics

Continuing Your Education

In a world of excellent, innovative EMS educators, Heather Davis stands out. A registered paramedic with a master’s degree and 20-plus years in EMS, she is a familiar face at state and national EMS conferences, bringing a unique spin to the educational realm with presentations like “Movies that Teach,” “Student Discipline” and “Leading from the [...]

Tags: ,  

Burn Basics

by Jim, October 18, 2010

in Paramedic Notes

Burn Basics

The severity of burns are determined by the Depth of the burn, the Extent or percentage of the total body surface burned, the Age of the patient, the Area or Part of the body that was involved, the patient’s Past Medical History and the Respiratory Involvement. The depth of the injury is proportional to the [...]

 

What Is “Shock”?

by Jim, October 17, 2010

in Paramedic Notes

What Is “Shock”?

Under normal conditions, the proper circulatory function is dependent on adequate blood volume (the fluid), proper vascular tone (the container) and adequate cardiac output (the pump). When one of these three systems fail and decreased blood flow to vital organs is recognized by the body, the condition or state of shock develops as the body [...]

 

Why Does The NREMT Feel So Hard?

by Jim, October 15, 2010

in NREMT Exam Information

Why Does The NREMT Feel So Hard?

To study and better prepare the NREMT, you must first understand the way the NREMT exam is designed. The NREMT exam is an adaptive test called a Computer Adaptive Test (often referred to as a CT or CAT). This type of test is computer-based and adapts to the test taker’s responses through Item Response Theory [...]

 

  Newer Entries »

© Mintaka Theme Copyright WPCorner

Find WP Themes at WPCorner | Sponsored by Wicked Kalamazoo | Wicked Little Rock